“Rev War Revelry” Author Discussion: Eric Sterner – “Anatomy of a Massacre: The Destruction of Gnadenhutten, 1782”

Gnadenhutten. Pronounced with a silent “G” does not smoothly roll of the tongue. Nor is it a historical event that most people are aware of. Cue Eric Stener, historian with Emerging Revolutionary War, contributing historian to both the Journal of the American Revolution and Emerging Civil War while conducting a career in government and public policy, specializing on national security and aerospace.

And now specializing on the Massacre at Gnadenhutten. His latest publication, part of the Journal of American Revolution Books is a November 2020 release that examines the March 8, 1872 massacre of peaceful Native Americans under the tutelage of missionaries from the Church of the United Brethren. Conducted by western settlers, the atrocity caught the attention of revolutionaries such as Benjamin Franklin who wrote, “the abominable Murders committed by some of the frontier People on the poor Moravian Indians, has given me infinite Pain and Vexation.”

Although “ample incidents of good and evil on March 8, that summation does not explain what brought murderers and victims together on the banks of the Muskingum River in today’s Ohio.”

For that reason we turn to the next “Rev War Revelry” this Sunday, at 7 p.m. EST on our Facebook page as we discuss his latest work with author Eric Sterner. For more information or to purchase your copy of his book, click here.

We look forward to you joining us this Sunday for the next historian happy hour!

This entry was posted in Emerging Revolutionary War, Memory, Native American, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to “Rev War Revelry” Author Discussion: Eric Sterner – “Anatomy of a Massacre: The Destruction of Gnadenhutten, 1782”

  1. Betsy Saxer says:

    Gnadenhutten is pronounced with the G: as inj
    juh-nadenhutten. We live there. There is a G.

    Liked by 1 person

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