Author Archives: Rob Orrison

Revolutionary Projects in Concord, Massachusetts

Recently, ERW members Phil Greenwalt and Rob Orrison spent the 241st anniversary of the opening of the American Revolution in the outskirts of Boston in Concord, Massachusetts.  It was a whirlwind trip of research, photos and most importantly meeting the … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Civilian, Memory, Militia (Patriot) Leadership, National Park Service, Personalities, Revolutionary War, Slavery, Uncategorized | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Through the Lense of History: May 3, 1775

  Often the study of history can ground us and make us feel less “unique.” This allows us to hopefully put our own experiences into perspective and be able to hopefully learn from lessons of the past.  Many today complain … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Campaigns, Civilian, Memory, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Emerging Revolutionary War in Civil War Trust’s Hallowed Ground

Recently Emerging Revolutionary War Era authors Phillip Greenwalt and Rob Orrison were featured in Hallowed Ground, the Civil War Trust’s quarterly magazine. Their article “Shots Heard Around the World” focuses on the events surrounding Lexington and Concord in 1775. As CWT President … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Militia (Patriot) Leadership, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

ERW Weekender – In the Footsteps of Young George Washington

Recently myself and two other Emerging Rev War authors took a trek to the mountains of western Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania to follow in the footsteps of George Washington in 1754-1758.  Washington played a significant role in the beginning of the French … Continue reading

Posted in Revolutionary War, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Robert “King” Carter and the Father of our Country – Connecting the Dots of History

A lot of understanding history is understanding connections. Making relevant connections and interpreting those connections to people. Recently I played a part in curating a new exhibit at the Manassas Museum. This exhibit “A Virginia Aristocracy: The Carters of Virginia” … Continue reading

Posted in Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

“Our clocks are slow” L’Hermione, Lafayette and the Franco-American Alliance

With the visit of the L’Hermione to the east coast of the United States this summer, there has been a heightened interest in the Franco-American alliance that won the American Revolution.  The French rebuilt the L’Hermione not only for its … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Return of L’Hermoine

It will be hard to describe in modern terms the celebrity of Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier de Lafayette, Marquis de Lafayette (aka LaFayette) in 18th century America. The young Marquis was fascinated with the American ideal of … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

240th Anniversary of the “Shot Heard Around the World”

As we remember the events around Bennett Place this weekend, keep in mind our friends near Boston are commemorating another important anniversary.  Today marks the 240th anniversary of the battles of Lexington and Concord.  To read more about the events taking … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

“A Negro Man”: Prince Estabrook of Lexington

As the British under Lt. Col. Francis Smith marched out of Lexington on the morning of April 19th, they left behind them 18 American casualties. One of these men who suffered wounds that morning was Prince Estabrook. Estabrook was unlike … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Lexington Part II – “Our troops advanced towards them, without any intention of injuring them.” Who Fired First at Lexington?

  The above words were written by Lt. Col. Francis Smith in his official report to General Thomas Gage. Smith, in command of the British expedition to Concord recently returned from what would be the opening salvo of rebellion. Smith … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments