Author Archives: William Griffith

Arnold’s Treason: 240 Years Later – The Capture of Major Andre (September 23, 1780)

Major Andre cautiously rode his horse through unfamiliar territory between American and British lines. It was a neutral zone wreathing with unforgiving bands of Cowboys and Skinners, but ground that Andre, garbed in civilian clothing, needed to cross in order … Continue reading

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Arnold’s Treason: 240 Years Later – “The Tempter and the Traitor” (September 22, 1780)

It was a meeting that decided the fates of Benedict Arnold and John Andre. Not necessarily because of what had been discussed, but because of the unraveling circumstances surrounding it. Within several days, Arnold would be fleeing his once beloved … Continue reading

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Arnold’s Treason: 240 Years Later – August 30, 1780

On August 30, 1780, Benedict Arnold fully committed to treason by accepting the final terms presented by Sir Henry Clinton regarding the plot to turn over the fortifications at West Point to the British. Arnold’s reply to a letter written … Continue reading

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Arnold’s Treason: 240 Years Later

This is the first part of what will be a running series that will highlight the 240th anniversary of the events surrounding Benedict Arnold’s treason. The story of Benedict Arnold’s treason during the Revolutionary War is one of the most … Continue reading

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“A damned old rebel, with one foot in the grave”: The Deposition of Elizabeth Covenhoven, Monmouth County, New Jersey, July 30, 1778

The lead elements of Sir Henry Clinton’s army trudged into the village of Monmouth Court House, New Jersey throughout the day on June 26, 1778. There, the British force remained until the morning of the 28th, when it continued onward … Continue reading

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“Grateful Remembrance”: A Monument to General Montgomery

It was New Years’ Eve, 1775. An American army, divided into two wings, assaults the lower town outside the walls of British-held Quebec, Canada. Through a blinding snowstorm, Col. Benedict Arnold led 600 men along the northern edge of the … Continue reading

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Slaughter at Sabbath Day Point

Last week during Emerging Revolutionary War’s annual getaway, we made our way north along the western shore of Lake George in New York’s Adirondack Mountains. Our destination was Fort Ticonderoga. The group made a quick stop at a new historical … Continue reading

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“A Very Handsom Retreet”: Lt. Colonel Nathan Whiting and the Fighting Retreat that Decided the Battle of Lake George

This is a post from September 2016. It focuses on a critical military action that occurred during the Battle of Lake George, 264 years ago, today: When analyzing the key actions of a military engagement in order to pinpoint a … Continue reading

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“Shaking Leaves” and a “Damned Poltroon”?: Charles Lee, George Washington, and the 241st Anniversary of the Battle of Monmouth Court House

Two-hundred and forty one years ago, today, one of the most famous, yet controversial, exchanges between two commanding generals on a battlefield occurred in a field west of Monmouth Court House (present-day Freehold), New Jersey. George Washington had arrived in … Continue reading

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An Interesting “What If?” Question: Benedict Arnold and the Monmouth Campaign

So recently I have been working on a Monmouth Court House project. Last night an alternate scenario popped into my head. I wanted to ask you, the readers, your opinion. During the spring of 1778, what if Charles Lee, recently … Continue reading

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